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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone - have just ordered my new Eclipse PHEV

Wait time is a reasonable 3 months---- anything is reasonable compared to the 18 months on a RAV4!

After endless research and test driving I chose the PHEV Eclipse.

Reasons:

1/ Same basic size as RAV4 but felt a tighter drive. Loved the way you could run on EV mode only. Ability to charge off my solar a plus. Where is the PHEV Toyota?!
2/ The car in EV only mode drives like a proper EV. I have driven the Tesla and a few others. It felt pretty much the same. Quite, responsive, no gearing etc
3/ No charging infrastructure. Despite this, if I find one - the car has the DC fast charging that should keep me going another 50km (it's all i do each day to from work) in only 15-20 mins...that is pretty good... if only there were more chargers out there!
4/ Should be a pretty good bridge into full EV ownership whilst waiting for more fast charger technology which IMO is the NO.1 thing holding back EV rollouts...I get to find, follow and learn to use the charger stations without all anxiety about "what if there isn't a space?" or what if they are broken, or will it make me run late waiting for my next business appointment? ie you have to be able to compete with the 5-10 min petrol full 400km capacity tank fill at the pump..I'd rather wait till fast charging on the road and greater battery capacity is main stream in AUS.. this is the best of both worlds

Just MO

Thanks!
 

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Hi everyone - have just ordered my new Eclipse PHEV

Wait time is a reasonable 3 months---- anything is reasonable compared to the 18 months on a RAV4!

After endless research and test driving I chose the PHEV Eclipse.

Reasons:

1/ Same basic size as RAV4 but felt a tighter drive. Loved the way you could run on EV mode only. Ability to charge off my solar a plus. Where is the PHEV Toyota?!
2/ The car in EV only mode drives like a proper EV. I have driven the Tesla and a few others. It felt pretty much the same. Quite, responsive, no gearing etc
3/ No charging infrastructure. Despite this, if I find one - the car has the DC fast charging that should keep me going another 50km (it's all i do each day to from work) in only 15-20 mins...that is pretty good... if only there were more chargers out there!
4/ Should be a pretty good bridge into full EV ownership whilst waiting for more fast charger technology which IMO is the NO.1 thing holding back EV rollouts...I get to find, follow and learn to use the charger stations without all anxiety about "what if there isn't a space?" or what if they are broken, or will it make me run late waiting for my next business appointment? ie you have to be able to compete with the 5-10 min petrol full 400km capacity tank fill at the pump..I'd rather wait till fast charging on the road and greater battery capacity is main stream in AUS.. this is the best of both worlds

Just MO

Thanks!
Hi there Phevdude,
I also ordered a Phev Eclipse Cross just before Christmas, expecting delivery in March.

My rationale was the following set of reasons:
1. I have a daily commute of around 25km to work and back, well within the phev range. This would be around 80 to 90 percent of it's use.
2. I can plug in at home and at work.
3. I ski in the winter, around 170kms round trip. 4wd is a must have.
4. I occasionally tow a boat of around 1.4 tonne.
5. Our children have just left home, so a smaller Suv suits our normal requirements.
6. We have a general desire to reduce emissions for the planet, without creating a huge usage compromise. The additional cost of the Phev is the variable that we are prepared to wear.
7. I don't want an Ev at this stage due to the expected high planning requirements for recharging spots around NZ.

I agree with most of your points, and find it interesting that I have a few others to add.
Do any of mine resonate?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi there Phevdude,
I also ordered a Phev Eclipse Cross just before Christmas, expecting delivery in March.

My rationale was the following set of reasons:
1. I have a daily commute of around 25km to work and back, well within the phev range. This would be around 80 to 90 percent of it's use.
2. I can plug in at home and at work.
3. I ski in the winter, around 170kms round trip. 4wd is a must have.
4. I occasionally tow a boat of around 1.4 tonne.
5. Our children have just left home, so a smaller Suv suits our normal requirements.
6. We have a general desire to reduce emissions for the planet, without creating a huge usage compromise. The additional cost of the Phev is the variable that we are prepared to wear.
7. I don't want an Ev at this stage due to the expected high planning requirements for recharging spots around NZ.

I agree with most of your points, and find it interesting that I have a few others to add.
Do any of mine resonate?
Every single one! 100%!
 

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Just beware of steep boat ramps. Electric motors do not have torque from 0 rpm. Once they are going they have plenty. But look on youtube or google for people pulling boats out in EV's
Thanks Ddj for the heads up!
I presume the advice would be to engage the parallel mode engine plus ev for boats?
On the subject of torque from electric motors, I was of the understanding they have superior immediate torque than an ICE? I thought that's why Teslas out sprint supercars etc. Did I get that wrong?
 

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Try Driving A PHEV up a hill with a trailer on the back. Stopping on the incline, then pull away. The system just shuts down if the Strain is too much. Something to beware of.

And ICE will not drive wheels until 60kmh approx. When it does drive wheels it is a direct drive, No clutch slippage is available.

The torque is superior with the EV... But with an extra load on an incline it will not cope. Like i said look on youtube, and see the PHEV slipping underwater as it gets pulled in by the boat. It is a big boat, but it still can happen with a single wheel trailer.
 

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Hi there Phevdude,
I also ordered a Phev Eclipse Cross just before Christmas, expecting delivery in March.

My rationale was the following set of reasons:
1. I have a daily commute of around 25km to work and back, well within the phev range. This would be around 80 to 90 percent of it's use.
2. I can plug in at home and at work.
3. I ski in the winter, around 170kms round trip. 4wd is a must have.
4. I occasionally tow a boat of around 1.4 tonne.
5. Our children have just left home, so a smaller Suv suits our normal requirements.
6. We have a general desire to reduce emissions for the planet, without creating a huge usage compromise. The additional cost of the Phev is the variable that we are prepared to wear.
7. I don't want an Ev at this stage due to the expected high planning requirements for recharging spots around NZ.

I agree with most of your points, and find it interesting that I have a few others to add.
Do any of mine resonate?
Totally agree with you JonoNz68 on all points. I ordered mone in Jan so due mid April.
 

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Try Driving A PHEV up a hill with a trailer on the back. Stopping on the incline, then pull away. The system just shuts down if the Strain is too much. Something to beware of.

And ICE will not drive wheels until 60kmh approx. When it does drive wheels it is a direct drive, No clutch slippage is available.

The torque is superior with the EV... But with an extra load on an incline it will not cope. Like i said look on youtube, and see the PHEV slipping underwater as it gets pulled in by the boat. It is a big boat, but it still can happen with a single wheel trailer.
Thanks again Dddj, you have done a great job of explaining the issues and risks. I will keep these things in mind when pulling heavy loads, and try not to stop on an uphill stretch.
As the saying goes, forewarned is forarmed.
There is usually family 4wd vehicles when we go boating, so I probably won't pull out if the ramp is steep.
Regards, Jono.
 
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