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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi guys, i have the eclips cross 2WD 2018, that throttle latency/delay is really bothering me, some times it takes up to 1-2 secs to get the power.
I am aware this is common issue in turbo engines, but still i would expect it to react faster.
Is there any SW/HW modification can be done to improve this?
I am actually considering selling the car because of this issue, it has all this power but when you need it immediately - you cant get it.

by the way, i am not on eco mode.
 

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Hi. I think your car has CVT. When i tested the car there was only CVT option for testing. After the first 100 meters i switched it to manual mode, and i saw the engine had a great throttle response. At the end i ordered manuel transmission version.

You can use manual when you need it. If that won't be enough you can install a throttle response increaser (it sounds like a stupid definition i know :) ) to the throttle pedal. It makes a great difference.
 

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Hi this might be silly but I have a automatic USA version eclipse cross is there a a manual mode on this vehicle ? I've had my suv a month.
 

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Mitsubishi calls it "Sport Mode". It's described on Page 5-63 of the manual. Put it in drive and then slide the lever to the left.
 

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Best you can do if you have an A/T is to keep it in Sport / Tiptronic mode, and let the engine rev to its max until it shifts itself.
Until Mitsubishi figures out how to get out from underneath Nissan, we're stuck with their shitty bottom of the barrel CVT transmissions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Best you can do if you have an A/T is to keep it in Sport / Tiptronic mode, and let the engine rev to its max until it shifts itself.
Until Mitsubishi figures out how to get out from underneath Nissan, we're stuck with their shitty bottom of the barrel CVT transmissions.
Yes that's nice but the problem is it does not shift down in a way that you can actually drive like that, and handling manual shifting is not something i like.
Next time i buy a car i make sure it has good react time when you push a gas.
 

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Hi guys, i have the eclips cross 2WD 2018, that throttle latency/delay is really bothering me, some times it takes up to 1-2 secs to get the power.
I am aware this is common issue in turbo engines, but still i would expect it to react faster.
Is there any SW/HW modification can be done to improve this?
I am actually considering selling the car because of this issue, it has all this power but when you need it immediately - you cant get it.

by the way, i am not on eco mode.
I have the same problem, went for my first service, spoke to the service team to look into the throttle response.
On picking the vehicle up i was told they had checked everything out and could not find any faults.
I emailed Mitsubishi about the problem,they referred me back to the dealer.
I think they no about this problem as i read several right ups complaining about the throttle response.
Mitsubishi just not interested in solving this problem.
 

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There's nothing wrong with the vehicle throttle response.... i realise that many owners aren't familiar with their vehicle simple because they have not read the user manual throughout or they are use to driving another style vehicle.
Most of the drawn out lastic band feel from a cvt is not from the actual metal band stretching as discribe by many so-called engineer ...however its the torque converter not locking up aggressively, mainly to protect n extend the life of a cvt ... however the sport feature/ paddle shifters or shift stick is to be use to lock the torque converter when moving from a dead stop...so let say Yoyo needs to move off faster off the line, the very fact that you press the gas hard will cause even more of a delay, because the ecu software are program to counter such an action... this is a early safety measure to protect tranny as well as avoid garage parking incidents of accidental gas pedal use.. Instead, a gradual pressure increase should be apply when in normal mode... but otherwise in sport mode, torque will lock and a faster aggressive take off will be achieved...
My advice if theres a need to take off fast, select sport mode, which will read gear 1 at dead stop, drive off and after reaching your accelerating momentum, switch back shift to regular "D" , in so doing you will not have to content with the correct timing change of gears...
Other info when driving mitsubishi is that the Ecu has up to 6 different maps which it alternate base on driving style.
Hence if you're and aggressive driver, after realizing your driving style vehicle will adapt map that fits...this selected map stays until vehicle comes to a stand still for more than a 30 seconds. But once stop for longer it revert to sluggish default map in an effort to save fuel n minimize wear n tear.
If we as user understand this and practice this style of driving we will be getting more out of the vehicle....
If your driving is moving foot from gas to brake, gas to brake... your just not driving economically....
Practice using sport mode to get use to timing change as this feature if understood would be very effective, in a get away situation or race..
......... . Sorry for lenghtly ✍ .....
 

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Best you can do if you have an A/T is to keep it in Sport / Tiptronic mode, and let the engine rev to its max until it shifts itself.
Until Mitsubishi figures out how to get out from underneath Nissan, we're stuck with their shitty bottom of the barrel CVT transmissions.
No disrespect, but what your saying is crap... theres no way she can be driving around like this... you need to stop cry about not getting your sport race car...the cvt in this vehicle is more than capable to handle the power of this engine.
If you dislike the vehicle thats your rights but don't misinform
 

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disrespect, but what your saying is crap... theres no way she can be driving around like this..
I don't need to. I already have 5 other "sport race cars", thanks.
And, if you really think that this CVT is great --- LOL --- then good on you. I'm not talking about the CVT being able to handle the power output - I'm talking about it not being optimized to maximize the output of the engine, as the OP's main concern was just this.

I don't think you want to debate me on technical shit, bub.
 

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I did not at any point said or believe that the CVT is great... I said that its more than adequate to handle the power that this engine offers... now if your talking about optimizing performance of this vehicle ...we all know its limit and obviously your not satisfy.... simple just drive 1 of your dam 5 sport vehicle and shut your crap... mitsubishi did not produce this vehicle for performance/sport nor racing...we all wish it was, but its not. Now move on with your negativity and stop give bad advice to member on forum.
And why would I argue on technical stuff with someone who seems to be knowledgeable yet continue to speak otherwise:cool:
 

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Can we take it down a notch or two and try to behave as if our mother's were in the room? After all, we're not running for president of the U.S. ;)

For the record, the OP was only concerned with power at low rpm and not necessarily overall performance. While it is true that the turbo doesn't develop top torque until it hits 2,000 rpm, it's also true that punching the gas at sub-2k rpm will make the ECU instruct torque converter to slip to protect the transmission. Operating in sport mode didn't seem to be a viable option. Some cars and some people end up not being a good match. And, FWIW, the OP hasn't been back to the forums since July, so we're really just discussing this amongst ourselves, at this point.

@Willisjamaica you have to admit that Mitsubishi set themselves up for this sort of criticism by invoking the Eclipse name in a vehicle that clearly isn't a sports car. Sports car fans, Mitsubishi fans, and specifically Eclipse fans are still grousing about it, as if some unspoken racing/rally line has been crossed. Imagine what would happen if Ford put "Mustang" on a minivan or Chevy released a "Corvette" with a 4-cylinder CVT in it. So, when people buy the car with the impression that it's going to live up to the name, when they try and drive it that way, it's clearly a disappointment.

@slippercream in the grand scheme, I tend to lean to the side of @Willisjamaica in the assessment of the EC. The 1.5L turbo with the CVT is perfectly suitable for what it is. The Eclipse Cross is not a sports car. It was never intended to be a sports car. It is a compact utility vehicle with an emphasis on the utility. Trips around town, cruising on the highway, hauling a couple of bikes to the beach or the occasional jaunt through the wilderness are where the EC shines. I don't think any reasonable person would expect to see one in the next movie unless it was "Fast and Furious, Rest home Reunion." ;)

I have heard a lot of crap about the Jatco CVTs, but frankly that's not been my experience. Maybe because I tend to drive fairly conservatively, perform recommended maintenance and don't expect race car performance from my daily commuter vehicle. Time will tell.

Circling back to the original topic, as pointed out, switching to sport mode does mitigate the power delay within the design specs of this car. For the occasional need to pull out into traffic or pass a slow moving truck, that should be more than adequate. If you are driving with the pedal to the floor all the time, I don't care what kind of car you have, unless you have a pit crew to rebuild everything twice a month, you are going to have mechanical problems.
 

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Can we take it down a notch or two and try to behave as if our mother's were in the room? After all, we're not running for president of the U.S. ;)

For the record, the OP was only concerned with power at low rpm and not necessarily overall performance. While it is true that the turbo doesn't develop top torque until it hits 2,000 rpm, it's also true that punching the gas at sub-2k rpm will make the ECU instruct torque converter to slip to protect the transmission. Operating in sport mode didn't seem to be a viable option. Some cars and some people end up not being a good match. And, FWIW, the OP hasn't been back to the forums since July, so we're really just discussing this amongst ourselves, at this point.

@Willisjamaica you have to admit that Mitsubishi set themselves up for this sort of criticism by invoking the Eclipse name in a vehicle that clearly isn't a sports car. Sports car fans, Mitsubishi fans, and specifically Eclipse fans are still grousing about it, as if some unspoken racing/rally line has been crossed. Imagine what would happen if Ford put "Mustang" on a minivan or Chevy released a "Corvette" with a 4-cylinder CVT in it. So, when people buy the car with the impression that it's going to live up to the name, when they try and drive it that way, it's clearly a disappointment.

@slippercream in the grand scheme, I tend to lean to the side of @Willisjamaica in the assessment of the EC. The 1.5L turbo with the CVT is perfectly suitable for what it is. The Eclipse Cross is not a sports car. It was never intended to be a sports car. It is a compact utility vehicle with an emphasis on the utility. Trips around town, cruising on the highway, hauling a couple of bikes to the beach or the occasional jaunt through the wilderness are where the EC shines. I don't think any reasonable person would expect to see one in the next movie unless it was "Fast and Furious, Rest home Reunion." ;)

I have heard a lot of crap about the Jatco CVTs, but frankly that's not been my experience. Maybe because I tend to drive fairly conservatively, perform recommended maintenance and don't expect race car performance from my daily commuter vehicle. Time will tell.

Circling back to the original topic, as pointed out, switching to sport mode does mitigate the power delay within the design specs of this car. For the occasional need to pull out into traffic or pass a slow moving truck, that should be more than adequate. If you are driving with the pedal to the floor all the time, I don't care what kind of car you have, unless you have a pit crew to rebuild everything twice a month, you are going to have mechanical problems.
I agree ... notch turn down:)...
While I understand that the eclipse name would trigger debates....I dont see why it such a ungoing...when I was first made aware about an new eclipse to be made by mitsubishi I was surprise as I know that the company didn't plan on making any thing but suv in the near future....when I read up on story I realise that it was not actually an eclipse but an cross over deviant name eclipse-cross.
At no point did mitsubishi intend for this to be a replacement for the eclipse, however media mis represent and cause this on going discussion about mitsubishi changing up the eclipse to a family vehicle, truth is they did not they borrow the popular name and place on vehicle ..yes they knew it would draw attention and controversy and I believe that was intentional.
A Ford minivan- Mustang would definately not be a Ford mustang...a Chevy corvette with a 4 cylinder is just the 4 cylinder version of the Chevy Corvette.... Toyota has now produce the corolla-cross as well as many companies having a domesticated version of a sport/race model (example golf and golf gti) its all a marketing stunt by manufacturer to sell cars ...
The issue that many have is simple the fact that Mitsubishi didn't produce an sport/race version, which is still possible, but reality is that this vehicle is getting a lot of hate online however mitsubishi are improving in sales and keeping their head above water as opposed to making a sport model vehicle that just not selling.. so strategy is to make what sells and once a capital is enough to be able to produce sport race vehicle I know they will do so. But for us to request and want mitsubishi to commit suicide is just unfair.... I can assure u that if they should come out with and evo or eclipse that the anticipation and suspense will sell without much effort from mitsubishi... but for now build a domestic market gain capital and then appease the sport enthusiasts....so let us just wait, if we can't then move to another brand that can satisfy our desires.
 

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Enter the Raptor. And the Bronco. And many other entrants to the "Sport" segment. Heck, even Land Rover is getting back into it.

So, yes, criticize Marketing for all its shortcomings - a company decides its fate when it calls something a swan when it in fact sells a goose. Or vice versa. And Outlander Sport isn't a sportier Outlander. An Eclipse Cross, however is a crossover variant of a sporty Eclipse. And, we know this isn't a Pajero or an L200. However, I expect something that's named after a vehicle with a storied history, to live up to expectations. This is why I put in a lot of effort up front to determine how feasible it is to modify the Cross.

If I didn't have other more erstwhile "projects" to pursue, then I would have done this. Truth is, it's much, MUCH easier to modify an Outlander Sport than it is a Cross. Simply due to the fact that the Sport shares so much more with the Evo than the latter. So, that's that.

Regardless - you may both be right. If I bought a shopping cart, I'd best not expect that it can perform like a Go-Kart at the track.
But, therein lies the challenge --- I was still expecting the Eclipse Cross to perform well in an off-road situation (think rallycross track), being an Eclipse "cross", after all. Totally not the case.

That's where Mitsubishi dropped the ball. An Outlander felt more planted than the Cross. Despite having the same CVT. Why is that?
Go figure.
 

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Enter the Raptor. And the Bronco. And many other entrants to the "Sport" segment. Heck, even Land Rover is getting back into it.

So, yes, criticize Marketing for all its shortcomings - a company decides its fate when it calls something a swan when it in fact sells a goose. Or vice versa. And Outlander Sport isn't a sportier Outlander. An Eclipse Cross, however is a crossover variant of a sporty Eclipse. And, we know this isn't a Pajero or an L200. However, I expect something that's named after a vehicle with a storied history, to live up to expectations. This is why I put in a lot of effort up front to determine how feasible it is to modify the Cross.

If I didn't have other more erstwhile "projects" to pursue, then I would have done this. Truth is, it's much, MUCH easier to modify an Outlander Sport than it is a Cross. Simply due to the fact that the Sport shares so much more with the Evo than the latter. So, that's that.

Regardless - you may both be right. If I bought a shopping cart, I'd best not expect that it can perform like a Go-Kart at the track.
But, therein lies the challenge --- I was still expecting the Eclipse Cross to perform well in an off-road situation (think rallycross track), being an Eclipse "cross", after all. Totally not the case.

That's where Mitsubishi dropped the ball. An Outlander felt more planted than the Cross. Despite having the same CVT. Why is that?
Go figure.
I get what your saying as I had expected there to be room to modify... however the short coming of the tranny limits. And for a fairly new vehicle its hard and expensive to experiment with...
The eclipse cross in my region comes with enigine option of the outlander sport 2 liter engine the drive train are similar however operate differently but I see the sawc as a plus over the sport.
After learning the limitation of tranny I just accept that I am going just tweak engine power just below the know 200lb torque capacity... and just enjoy the vehicle for what it is...however further down the road if a sport variant is not produce then would go advance modification ....
The tranny in the diesel version can handle way more power as as use in some nissan and Renault vehicle using v6 engine.... however that would be an expensive swap now.
Other option is to swap an evo engine, twin clutch and drivetrain, which can be bolt on...but question is is it worth it ... but for someone like you slippercream I know it would be fun. ... butt I some how believe that Mitsubishi gonna slap these part from evo and ralliart unto the eclipse-cross sometime in the future when the eclipse-cross sale begins to fall... so its a waiting game.
Right now mitsubishi done so much to this vehicle to make it far from sporty and I believe its because they plan on producing an serious race version as I would expect one of these suv to usher in the future evo.. let's keep lobby for it, but for now I will be driving my old evo 7;)
 

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If you were to ask me, the Eclipse Cross was introduced specifically to compete with the other CUV's coming out of Japan. The CR-V and the HR-V's from Honda, Toyota's RAV4 and Subaru's Crosstrek. All they could bring to the party was unique Mitsubishi styling -- which some like and some hate -- but is not as universally generic as Honda and Toyota (Subaru does have it's own look) ... and the S-AWC from the EVO. But EVO wasn't technically a model, but a variation of the Lancer and they certainly couldn't call it a Lancer Cross or an EVO cross, so they took the Eclipse to keep a little of the brand equity. It does make sense to create a little controversy, especially in a brand that doesn't dominate the market (at least in the U.S.)

I think Mitsubishi is going to focus it's efforts on the hybrid and electric cars for the next few years and let the modders and motorheads take care of turning these into something with performance in mind.
 

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Not anytime soon, guys. Don't expect Mitsubishi to redirect efforts to Motorsports variants anytime soon. Heck, even MML doesn't get manufacturer support (they are 100% self-reliant and producing their own race parts). Ralliart doesn't exist anymore. Honestly, no one really knows whether Dr. Evo still works for Mitsubishi!

If the Cross and the new Outlander do not perform, expect there to be major restructuring to Mitsubishi in the next few years - and forget any hopes of getting performance variants of Mitsubishi vehicles for the foreseeable future (10 years, at least). The only true bona-fide opening Mitsubishi has at the moment is to continue participating in Dakar, with the Cross T1 to be outfitted with newer hybrid tech (not sure about any FIA homologation rules for Dakar regarding electrified components.). Because it's already missing out with WRC e-class (who by the way is looking for new sponsors... so who knows where WRC is headed).

As for parts and components, Mitsubishi still has its patents. And there's still aftermarket manufacturing bolt-on and plug-in support for motorsports designs. Nothing new, but at least we have whatever's compatible with the 4B** block, which is already a much-aged 12-year design platform that's in need of refinement.

In my opinion, Mitsubishi's best, bold bet is to partner with OEM manufacturers like it has in the past - starting with Bilstein, Brembo, Getrag, Recaro, MHI, and maybe (not that it would pass muster with Nissan) Aisin --- and produce bolt-ons to its current lineup and ditch their stupid Marketing stunts with "black edition" shit. Revive the Ralliart line with upgraded bits for roadgoing vehicles. And see where the road leads them.

Right now, Mitsubishi can't compete. So build strategic partnerships to help you build a pathway to do so.

EVERYONE who's grown up with fast, fun cars misses having a grocery-getter that slays. I totally can see a case where the average 20-30-something middle-class commuter would buy a "fun" Eclipse Cross with tighter suspension and a loud blowoff valve. And those would hardly cost Mitsubishi anything from both a COGS and engineering perspective to get to the showroom floor.
 

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Not anytime soon, guys. Don't expect Mitsubishi to redirect efforts to Motorsports variants anytime soon. Heck, even MML doesn't get manufacturer support (they are 100% self-reliant and producing their own race parts). Ralliart doesn't exist anymore. Honestly, no one really knows whether Dr. Evo still works for Mitsubishi!

If the Cross and the new Outlander do not perform, expect there to be major restructuring to Mitsubishi in the next few years - and forget any hopes of getting performance variants of Mitsubishi vehicles for the foreseeable future (10 years, at least). The only true bona-fide opening Mitsubishi has at the moment is to continue participating in Dakar, with the Cross T1 to be outfitted with newer hybrid tech (not sure about any FIA homologation rules for Dakar regarding electrified components.). Because it's already missing out with WRC e-class (who by the way is looking for new sponsors... so who knows where WRC is headed).

As for parts and components, Mitsubishi still has its patents. And there's still aftermarket manufacturing bolt-on and plug-in support for motorsports designs. Nothing new, but at least we have whatever's compatible with the 4B** block, which is already a much-aged 12-year design platform that's in need of refinement.

In my opinion, Mitsubishi's best, bold bet is to partner with OEM manufacturers like it has in the past - starting with Bilstein, Brembo, Getrag, Recaro, MHI, and maybe (not that it would pass muster with Nissan) Aisin --- and produce bolt-ons to its current lineup and ditch their stupid Marketing stunts with "black edition" shit. Revive the Ralliart line with upgraded bits for roadgoing vehicles. And see where the road leads them.

Right now, Mitsubishi can't compete. So build strategic partnerships to help you build a pathway to do so.

EVERYONE who's grown up with fast, fun cars misses having a grocery-getter that slays. I totally can see a case where the average 20-30-something middle-class commuter would buy a "fun" Eclipse Cross with tighter suspension and a loud blowoff valve. And those would hardly cost Mitsubishi anything from both a COGS and engineering perspective to get to the showroom floor.
Totally agree ..... its not much of a stretch or expense to have slap on the 4b11 turbo ralliart power train in the eclipse cross and make that option available for sport minded individuals...
But their action and direction as present only pushes away a great deal of fan.....
I am only hoping that they decide to produce a turbocharge variant atleast 250hp up with the twin clutch seeing that they already gave us the drivetrain.
But like slippercream, I believe mitsubishi is a bit behind their own goals set as can be seen with the time release of eclipse cross as its design is still a age look... internal issue I think is to be blame more than finance.
 

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First off, Nissan. Jatco doesn't make DCTs. And between Mitsubishi's money woes and Nissan's sway on Mitsubishi --- renewing the contract for the DCT-470, while fantastic, will not be a strategic move nor likely possibility for Mitsubishi. Nissan alone would veto that, hands down. Because - surprise! Jatco won't be making money if Mitsubishi goes to Getrag, or Aisin... or, god forbid MHI starts making automotive transmissions again! Wouldn't that be something.

250hp... possible. But given the trajectory Mitsubishi is in, it's more likely we'll see a VQ engine in the bay of a Mitsu in the next few years than a Sirius or Cyclone... or whatever the 4Bxx codename is.
Heck, there were speculations Mitsubishi would have borrowed a platform from Renault to resurrect the Evo line. THAT, I believe, would piss EVERYONE off than resurrecting the Eclipse name into an SUV platform.

So, begs the question: why even buy a Mitsu to begin with? I mean, heck --- the last great thing they can slap on these new vehicles that's anything good is S-AWC. And do you see any good marketing around that? Coz I sure haven't.

I dunno - I'm just gonna troll forums for the next 10 years with all my thoughts about how great it was for Mitsu 10 years ago. Maybe then something will have changed.
I really don't mind that Mitsu is shifting its focus back to its Asian and Pacific markets. Hopefully if they focus well enough, they'll find their identity again.

Because right now, there is NOTHING truly notable in the Mitsubishi line. Remember, the Pajero is on its last throes. When that, too, is gone - what can Mitsubishi say it produces that does any one thing extremely well? Not tarmac racing, not WRC, not off-road, ... heck, nothing new for the past 12 years nor anything that's still in production that would pass homologation --- not even Dakar! (And no, the Eclipse T1 is a prototype / fabbed vehicle, not a production one.)

The past is where it is. I'm still holding out for hope that someone wises up and changes this trajectory. Because if not, I just don't see a path forward for Mitsu to get back to a decent fighting chance at getting back to a brand that people actually... really... want to buy.
 

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Honestly some days I’m surprised how slow the CVT is from a stop and others it seems zippy. Didn’t know there were different t maps . That would probably explain it. So it resets each time it’s turned off? That’s a shame.
 
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