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Check eBay to start. The bumper has several components to it.

Getting it used from someplace like LKQ or Pick-a-Part might be a more local option, if you have one close by.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was rear ended it’s nothing crazy but they need to put in a new bumper due to the blind spot sensors and I’ve been waiting already like 3 weeks for it and the body shop just told me they are trying to get it from somewhere in the states . I’m so upset they keep blaming COVID so just wondering if anyone knew where they have in stock bumper
 

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The upper (painted) part is more expensive than the lower. Generally, doing a search online could help you find available, in-stock ones from dealers like the ones in FL and there's one in TX that does direct-to-customer mail-order. Both aren't cheap because they're OEM.

I'd say the eBay ones are probably your best bet at the moment. Shipping will be killer, and that's why I say go to LKQ to see if they can source you the part. Since their distribution network already travels round the clock, shipping would be included - just that it might take time to get to you.

I don't know if there are aftermarket/OEM-style options available yet. Most online catalog wholesalers like CarID and RockAuto don't even have anything in stock at the moment (probably what the shop is referring to wrt COVID. Just let the shop do their thing - save you the hassle of having to piece this yourself.

Another thing to consider - and I can't believe I'm saying this since this is hilarious... parts for the Eclipse Cross compared to a Toyota or Honda are relatively rare. Not a lot of people have them, which means stock is also low. While it is sad, in some ways it's an upside. I've some cars (one, in particular) just like that - rare, if you might say. But to find parts for them --- they're a bitch. Flipside of rarity. It tends to be hard finding used parts, much less new ones. On the flipside, I take pride in the fact that most people don't even know what they're looking at when they see the car.

I say it's a "hiliarious" thought because the EC is still a current model in production. But I guess in some ways it's like owning a Suzuki back when they still sold cars in the US. Which is again a sad comparison --- because Mitsu really isn't as small and that strapped for cash as some companies like Suzuki are.

Nevertheless, good luck!
 

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Best bet would be Mitsubishi specific wrecking yards I would think. Assuming you have any near you. But I would assume you body shop would of thought of that. But you never know. Maybe try yellowpages.com or just google it in your city. Pick a part is harder as the newer models are super rare there. And when they do show they are stripped immediately. At least where I live. Good luck
 

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Your first thread was about dropping the receipt, and your second was because someone hit you. I'm excited and a bit nervous for your next one 😅
Seriously though goodluck with the repairs; You guys are talking about rare, I think you are right, I'm worried about Mitsubishi for sure although I see many Outlander and Sports.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lol you’re probably right :) . There have been a few Mitsubishi dealers closing that were near me and honestly not sure how they are I’m other than New York but they really don’t cater to customers like others car brands do
 

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Yeah, it's a sad plight. But, FWIW, try to stay away from small ones. You need to attach yourself to a reputable one. And, I regret to say this - but you want a large dealership when it comes to service. Small ones, especially the new ones, may not have the right people there who know the vehicles themselves. Most mechanics at smaller dealerships might be okay - can read a manual, and can wrench to torque specs. But the true veteran techs --- the ones you want --- chances are, they've taken up residence in larger dealerships.

I don't know NY like I do the South, but generally speaking Mitsubishi dealerships are both starved and hungry these days. Again, hate to sound unfair, but would you look for hungry contractors to build your masterpiece million-dollar mansion? Would you entrust your Bugatti to a Jiffy Lube? A bit dramatic, but that's what I mean. In many cases, you want to be "a number" - because dealerships who are "hungry" will look at a wrecked car in the Service bay and make you an instant target for a new sale.

I say this from experience - my sister in law is having issues right now with a dealership fixing a fender bender, and now saying they've got a bent frame --- AFTER parts were ordered. Can you hear a, "cha-ching" in the background? Our suspicion is, next thing we'll hear is, "we need to total it."

They are NOT a body shop. (In fact, the facility looks like a steel structure that reminds me of your typical used car dealership building. That's how bad the optics looked once I checked it out.) Their Service Department receiving bay was an awning. Not kidding you. I don't know where and how they actually work on vehicles without a dedicated bay!


Tow truck took the vehicle there right after the incident. She's now stuck in insurance claims land.

Point is, they're not even close to qualified to ascertain that this is a car with a bent frame. For all we know, their alignment guy might not know how to align a fucking wheel properly. Or that they don't know how to fix it, like real gearheads would. And by that I mean not by looking at a manual.

Anyway, that's my cautionary tale of the evening. I hope you get the right fix for your situation.
As an ulterior moral of the story here - if you don't want to get "screwed", take the time to know your vehicle, your business, and the support structures around you. It's like, if I know I'm flying close to, or around NY in the winter time, I'd avoid LGA at all costs. In this case, know the good dealerships from the bad - at least, get a good feel for what's right for you. The ones you feel you can trust and build a relationship with.

My sister-in-law is ex-military, tough as nails, and is a fighter. Far from a damsel in distress. But she isn't in the slightest bit mechanically inclined. Not a shortcoming, but she knows just enough to get by - to know she's getting screwed over. And she regrets making this split-second "transactional" error. Because she might be out of a car, and start from scratch with a new car note (she does have gap insurance, but still - 2.5 years lost on a 5-year note). If she just inquired a bit more about where the car was going, instead of letting the truck driver make the call to the closest dealership available, we might have been able to avoid this whole shennanigans.
 
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