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Discussion Starter #1
After successfully replacing the interior and license plate lamps with LED I looked at one of the only remaining filament bulbs on the EC - the turn signals (fog and reversing lamps are the others). The front turn lamps are PY21W bayonet fitting and I replaced them with 105 LED SMD LED's. The LED chips are mounted in rows around the side of the body and in a lens on the top of the lamp and give a good spread of light that is much brighter than the filament lamp so they are more easily seen at night with headlights on. See pics 1 and 2.

With the fronts replaced the turn signals operated normally without any hyper flash. Hyper flash is caused when replacing filament with LED as the LED draws less power. This drop in power is detected by the CANBUS as a possible broken bulb and the system increases the flash rate to notify the driver of the issue. Replacing the fronts was more fiddly as you need to pop off the wheel well trim and remove four scripts holding the splash guard in the wheel well but easily managed in the tight space.

The rear turn signals are much easier as they are held on with two screws and three metal locating/lock pins. The rear LED's are 21 LED SMD LED's which are also considerably brighter than the filaments they replace. The filament bulb is a T20 W21W 7440 bulb which is quite large though the replacement LED is longer but still fits comfortable into light housing. See pic 3.

When I initially had all LED's installed I tested simply by turning on the hazard flashers and all seemed OK with no hyper flash on any of the four turn signals. However, when I tested with just the right and left turn signals activated the lights would flash normally for the first few flashes and then drop into hyper flash. The rear turns were easier to get at so I removed them and replaced them with the 7440 filaments and hyper flash disappeared. So, I needed to increase the voltage load on each of the turn circuits. The easiest way was to install load resistors on the T20 rear circuit to increase the voltage draw of each turn circuit.

Typically you only need one load resistor for each circuit and not one per light location. I learned this when replacing my lamps on my Ducati Streetfighter motorcycle some years back. The PY12W resistors available to me already had lights attached to the cables so weren't an option. The rears, being T20 wedge, were available as just the resistor with male and female T20 plugs to fit straight into the harness. See pic 4.

Things are now working without any hyper flash on any of the turn signals. Total cost of the LED's and resistors was around AU$72 on eBay from an Australian seller who shipped quickly. There are many and varied LED's available on eBay and AliExpress but with the virus issues at the moment no-one in China is shipping anything so an Aussie seller was preferred.

Note that the resistor, when operating, generates significant heat and is best attached to a metal surface which can assist in dissipating the built up heat. This makes the rear turns the perfect choice as the rear pillar, where the light set is mounted is a good place to attach the resistor. Depends on how you want to attach it though. A screw is the best choice to ensure a solid seating and no rattles but, if you don't want to drill into the bodywork, a piece of heavy duty tape (duct tape or similar) either side of the resistor on the cabling would be possible. Never place the tape directly over the resistor as this will increase heat retention and reduce the life of the resistor.

Unfortunately I didn't take before and after pics of the lights as it was bright sunshine.
 

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Addendum. We have been in drought for some time but in the past three weeks that has been broken with heavy downpours. We have had 500mm of rain in the past three weeks and this got me rethinking the resistor installation on the rear lights. The resistors fit into the wiring loom but one plug set is open to water ingress so I removed the light from the EC and wrapped this open joint with self amalgamating tape to ensure no water penetration that may cause a short of the light circuit. Self amalgamating tape is used for electrical connection exposed to the weather in the open. I have used it on my antenna installations on the roof of my home. The tape is a tacky rubber that, once peeled from the backing and wrapped tightly around the joint and wiring, forms a solid rubber cover that is impervious to water. It is easily opened if there is a need to remove the cable in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Zarbs this sounds like a lot of work! I bet it looks really nice!
Nah, Beth. All up around 50 minutes including pulling it apart again to seal the joints. It's quite quick and easy. Hardest part was getting a grip on the front turns in the wheel well with the constricted access. The fronts at 21W for LED are now a beacon but much more noticeable at night with headlights on.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Covered in the owners manual:

1112
 
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